Monthly archives

Blog: One-size childcare policy fits no-one

There are a little more than 4 million children in Canada aged 0 to 12 years. They need care and education. I don’t think anyone really disputes this–youth 13 and older obviously also have needs for care and education but they’re not the focus of this post. In most cases, decisions about that care and education are made by parents or legal guardians who will have the bests interests of their children at heart. I don’t think anyone disputes this either. Those children and the families making decisions for them are really, really diverse. So why do we keep trying to produce national public policies on child-care that are one-size solutions?

read more


From the End of History to the End of Progress

A few years ago, we began noticing something very different about the way the public looked at the economy. The public seemed to believe that we were encountering an end of progress. The idea of a “better life” or what is known to the south as the American Dream seemed to be slipping away. Among citizens of both Canada and the United States, there was a growing recognition that the middle class bargain of shared prosperity…

read more


Unemployed and Underemployed Youth

In this new background paper from Canada 2020, we take a look at the employment landscape facing Canadian youth. The paper’s premise is built upon a simple and well-known fact: Canada’s future economic success will depend on the strength and quality of its human capital – and therefore its investment in young people. What this […]

read more


The New Clintonomics

Two weeks ago, two policy think tanks based in the U.S. and the UK — the Center for American Progress, founded by Bill Clinton’s former Chief of Staff John Podesta, and Policy Network, founded by former Labor Cabinet Minister Peter Mandelson and a group of former advisors to the government of Tony Blair — hosted a […]

read more


Omnibus budget legislation hits a new low

‘What does this have to do with the ways and means of the government?” It was a question asked in the mid 1990s by government House leader Herb Gray in the early days of the Chrétien government, during a briefing he was having with finance department officials on the Budget Implementation Act (BIA). Gray, then […]

read more


Can a Small Change Budget Transform Canada’s Economy?

The federal Budget thus far seems to be known most for eliminating the penny, a small change initiative if there ever was one.  Yet the government claims Budget 2012, entitled Jobs, Growth and Long Term Prosperity, will secure Canada’s long-term prosperity, which, according to Mr. Flaherty and the Prime Minister, is anchored in this country’s […]

read more