Monthly archives

Energy Policy Update – May 2015

Long a continental supplier to the world’s erstwhile largest energy consumer (China passed the US in 2012), the Canadian oil and gas sector has been secured by the principle of “Alberta makes and the US takes.” However, this energy future has all been called into question by the plunge in global oil prices and the resulting “new normal” operating environment. Can it remain that by the end of this decade, Canadian oil and liquefied natural gas (LNG) will begin to flow away from the increasingly saturated US market to offshore markets, primarily in the high growth Asia-Pacific region?

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The case for a carbon tax in Canada

In this latest addition to Canada 2020’s federal policy paper series, Nic Rivers from the University of Ottawa makes a convincing and comprehensive case for a carbon tax in Canada that moves well beyond the current sector-by-sector approach installed by the Harper government. Click to read the full report.

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Why would Canadians buy carbon pricing?

This paper serves as a summary of background information on climate and carbon pricing, how we got to the current political deadlock, and some options and factors that will influence decisions going forward. A first step is to reignite enthusiasm for this topic through identifying a refreshed mode of discussion. We can then begin to define a constructive and positive course of action that is based on a common Canadian sense of purpose that enables us truly to lead in this area.

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Labour is key to being an energy superpower

For six years now Prime Minister Stephen Harper has been referring to Canada as “an emerging energy superpower.” It is a very ambitious goal that comes with significant geopolitical clout, the likes of which this country has not enjoyed in decades, if ever. And it will not be achieved without considerable public policy action, especially […]

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