Monthly archives

Labour is key to being an energy superpower

For six years now Prime Minister Stephen Harper has been referring to Canada as “an emerging energy superpower.” It is a very ambitious goal that comes with significant geopolitical clout, the likes of which this country has not enjoyed in decades, if ever. And it will not be achieved without considerable public policy action, especially […]

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The carbon conversation we’re ready to have

Last Friday, I attended the Economic Club of Canada’s ‘first annual’ Energy Summit – a gathering of government and industry leaders for an all-day session at Calgary’s swanky Petroleum Club. (That’s 2 layers of club-hood, for those counting.) The purpose of the event was to have an insightful, forward-looking discussion about the state of Canada’s […]

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The New Clintonomics

Two weeks ago, two policy think tanks based in the U.S. and the UK — the Center for American Progress, founded by Bill Clinton’s former Chief of Staff John Podesta, and Policy Network, founded by former Labor Cabinet Minister Peter Mandelson and a group of former advisors to the government of Tony Blair — hosted a […]

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Inequality – defining the defining issue of our time

Growing inequality is, according to President Barack Obama, “the defining issue of our time.” In the week following his re-election, the president has vowed not to abandon his resolve to raise taxes on those earning over $250,000. This fascinates me. What is it that has propelled the issue of inequality to these dizzying heights? Which […]

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How to talk about a carbon price – without panicking

Today, Canada 2020 will host a public panel event in Ottawa on carbon pricing. It is called ‘How to sell carbon pricing to Canadians’ and we planned it last fall. As it turns out, our timing could not have been better. In the wake of Alberta Minister McQueen’s statement on a possible 40/40 carbon emissions […]

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Australia’s Asian Century – Canada’s too?

I am British by birth and Canadian by choice. While I have a healthy respect for the Commonwealth, I have never aspired to go beyond my two nationalities – until this week. Now I want to be an Australian. This admiration for Oz is precipitated by a new White Paper presented by the Australian government […]

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Omnibus budget legislation hits a new low

‘What does this have to do with the ways and means of the government?” It was a question asked in the mid 1990s by government House leader Herb Gray in the early days of the Chrétien government, during a briefing he was having with finance department officials on the Budget Implementation Act (BIA). Gray, then […]

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Falling off the ‘fiscal cliff’ will hurt Canada too

It has been said that when the U.S. sneezes Canada catches a cold.  Today, America’s economy has a low grade fever that could develop into pneumonia in the next few months.  This takes the economic form of relatively slow post-recession growth by US historical standards—an annualized rate of 2.0% according to the US Department of […]

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Healing Through Collaboration

This study looks at the Government of Nunavut’s Poverty Reduction process, a remarkable, year-long process that engaged some 800 of Nunavut’s 33,000 people, across the territory. The process resulted in recommendations in eight key areas, including the creation of a new kind of collaborative organization to lead community engagement on poverty reduction. Download the Full […]

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The New Deal for Skills-Based Graduates

Unemployment rates remain high and the latest data shows an uptick. Why is this, when so many businesses and companies are desperate for trained workers? The key to addressing this disconnect is to bring balance to the supply and demand for postsecondary graduates. In many sectors, this equation has lost its equilibrium. The proof is […]

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